Targeted Species

The Fiji waters that we fish are truly blessed with some of the greatest sport fish and there is no better charter to take you to these fish. On any given day we may come across Wahoo, Mahimahi, Spanish Mackeral, Giant Trevally (GT’s), Yellow fin tuna, Sailfish, Dogtooth Tuna and Marlin.

Wahoo (Acanthocybiumsolandri)

Is a scombridfish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. It is best known to sports fishermen, as its speed and high-quality flesh make it a prize game fish.

The body is elongated and covered with small, scarcely visible scales; the back is an iridescent blue, while the sides are silvery, with a pattern of irregular vertical blue bars and have razor sharp teeth. These colors fade rapidly at death. The mouth is large, and both the upper and lower jaws have a somewhat sharper appearance than those of king or Spanish mackerel. Specimens have been recorded at up to 2.5 meters (8 ft 2 in) in length, and weighing up to 83 kilograms (180 lb).[4] Growth can be rapid. One specimen tagged at 5 kilograms (11 lb) grew to 15 kg (33 lb) in one year. Wahoo can swim up to 60 mph (97 km/h).[5] They are some of the fastest fish in the sea.

Wahoo tend to be solitary or occur in loose-knit groups of two or three fish, but where conditions are suitable can be found in schools as large as 100 or more. Their diet is made up of other fish and squid.

Mahi-Mahi or common dolphinfish[1] (Coryphaenahippurus)

Is a surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore temperate, tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Also known widely as dorado, it is one of only two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the pompano dolphinfish.

Mahi-mahi can live up to 5 years (although they seldom exceed four). Catches average 7 to 13 kilograms (15 to 29 lb). They seldom exceed 15 kilograms (33 lb), and mahi-mahi over 18 kilograms (40 lb) are exceptional.

Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending nearly the entire length of their bodies. Their caudal fins and anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, and bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. Females have a rounded head. Females are also usually smaller than males.

Out of the water, the fish often change color among several hues (giving rise to their Spanish name, dorado, “golden”), finally fading to a muted yellow-grey upon death.

Mahi-mahi are among the fastest-growing fish. They spawn in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year, and their young are commonly found in seaweed. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other forage fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton and crustaceans.

Mahi-mahi fish are mostly found in the surface water. They feed on Sargassum weeds. Their flesh is soft and oily, similar to sardines. The body is slightly slender and long, making them fast swimmers; they can swim as fast as 50 knots (92.6 km/h, 57.5 mph).

Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnusalbacares)

Is a species of tuna found in pelagic waters of tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide.

The yellowfin tuna is among the larger tuna species, reaching weights of over 400 pounds (180 kg), but is significantly smaller than the Atlantic and Pacific Bluefin tunas, which can reach over 1,000 pounds (450 kg), and slightly smaller than the big eye tuna and the southern Bluefin tuna.

The second dorsal fin and the anal fin, as well as the finlets between those fins and the tail, are bright yellow, giving this fish its common name. The second dorsal and anal fins can be very long in mature specimens, reaching almost as far back as the tail and giving the appearance of sickles or scimitars. The pectoral fins are also longer than the related Bluefin tuna, but not as long as those of the albacore. The main body is a very dark metallic blue, changing to silver on the belly, which has about 20 vertical lines.
Reported sizes in the literature have ranged as high as 239 centimeters (94 in) in length and 200 kilograms (440 lb) in weight.

The giant trevally, Caranxignobilis (also known as the giant kingfish, lowly trevally, barrier trevally, ulua, or GT), is a species of large marinefish classified in the jack family, Carangidae.

Distinguished by its steep head profile, strong tail scutes, and a variety of other more detailed anatomical features. It is normally a silvery color with occasional dark spots, but males may be black once they mature. It is the largest fish in the genus Caranx, growing to a maximum known size of 170 cm and a weight of 80 kg.